Following closely on the heels of the MariaDB 5.3.4-rc release a couple of weeks ago, the MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB 5.3.5!

MariaDB 5.3.5 is the first stable (GA) release in the 5.3 series. Details and downloads are available from the following links:

(Debian and Ubuntu packages are available from our mirrored apt repositories. A sources.list generator is available.)

About MariaDB 5.3

The MariaDB 5.3 series introduces many new features, includes MariaDB
5.2, and is based on MariaDB 5.1 & MySQL 5.1. Some highlights of new
features in MariaDB 5.3 include:

  • subquery optimizations that finally make subqueries usable
  • many optimizer changes, including Classic Hash Join, Batched Key Access, a new implementation of Multi-Range-Read optimizations as well as Index Condition Pushdown
  • NoSQL-style interfaces via the HandlerSocket plugin as well as dynamic columns
  • group commit in XtraDB when the binary log is enabled
  • Microsoft Windows performance improvements

These are just some of the highlights, and for a more complete list of changes, please see the What is MariaDB 5.3 page.

We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB 5.5.20-alpha. MariaDB 5.5.20 is the first Alpha release in the 5.5 series. We hope to follow it up soon with a beta 5.5 release.

MariaDB 5.5.20-alpha is a merge of MariaDB 5.3 and MySQL 5.5 with some limited additional bug fixes. This is the first 5.5-based release, and we are releasing it now, intentionally without any extra features (and with it missing some planned features) to get it into the hands of any who might want to test it. Extra features planned for MariaDB 5.5 will be pushed into future releases.

As with any alpha release, MariaDB 5.5.20-alpha should not be used on production systems.

The Release Notes page has some notes on the release. There is also a Changelog available for those who are interested.

Sources, binaries and package downloads are available from our network of MariaDB mirrors. Debian and Ubuntu packages are available from our mirrored apt repositories. We have created a sources.list generator for creating sources.list entries.

About MariaDB 5.5

The MariaDB 5.5 series is the combination of MariaDB 5.3 and MySQL 5.5.

Please see the What is MariaDB 5.5 page for details.

Last weekend Vadim from Percona published his MariaDB 5.3.4 benchmark results. As the new benchmark guy at Monty Program I take this oportunity to add some more results of my own.

One question in the comments to Vadim was if it is fair to compare MariaDB-5.3 with MySQL-5.5. Or if this comparison should be done with MySQL-5.1. The answer is: it does not matter much. MySQL-5.5 and MySQL-5.1 show very similar results in the Sysbench OLTP benchmark.

So I created a Sysbench environment pretty much like Vadims and tested the following versions of the MySQL Server:

  • MariaDB-5.3.4 – the Monty Program release candidate, both with XtraDB and the InnoDB plugin
  • Percona-Server 5.1.61 because it is based on the same XtraDB version as MariaDB-5.3
  • Percona-Server 5.5.20 – the current Percona flagship
  • MySQL-5.5.20 – the current Oracle flagship

The result:

Indeed MariaDB-5.3.4 scales significantly worse than MySQL-5.5.20. However Percona-Server 5.1.61 behaves nearly identical and Percona-Server 5.5.20 is only slightly better. If we run MariaDB-5.3.4 with the InnoDB plugin instead of the default XtraDB, then MariaDB outperforms Percona-Server 5.5.20.

As a consequence, we will deliver the InnoDB plugin with future binary releases of MariaDB. MySQL-5.1.61 with the InnoDB plugin (not shown in the graph) is between MariaDB-5.3.4(InnoDB-plugin) and MySQL-5.5.20. We are currently investigating why MySQL-5.1 is faster than MariaDB-5.3, even with the same storage engine.

Please keep in mind that Sysbench is a highly synthetical benchmark. Real world workload will probably yield different results. Also this benchmark used solid state disks. A storage system with spinning disks might saturate much earlier and would then flatten out the peaks.

If I should draw a conclusion, then I would say that for highest concurrency levels you should go for MySQL-5.5. Or wait for MariaDB-5.5 :)

If your workload includes complex (sub)queries, then you will probably benefit more from MariaDBs new optimizer features. And if you are running replication, then MariaDB 5.3 with group-commit will greatly outperform any other MySQL version.

Benchmark details: sysbench OLTP multi-table. 16 tables with 250K rows each. 20G InnoDB buffer pool. Data and logs on SSD. Dual socket hexacore Xeon with HT enabled (24 logical cores). You can download the tarball with benchmark scripts, config and raw results.