Shortly after we released MariaDB 5.1.55, we also cooked MariaDB 5.2.5 (which includes MariaDB 5.1.55). See the release notes, and the changelog. Download MariaDB 5.2.5 now!

The developer meeting in Lisbon, Portugal is about to start, and there’s an agenda available. If you’re not going to be in Lisbon, please hop onto IRC and join the #maria channel on Saturday March 12 2011 (UTC+0) as the roadmap for MariaDB is to be discussed live as well as via IRC.

If you have further agenda items and cannot make it to Lisbon, use the mailing list: maria-developers@lists.launchpad.net – make sure you’re subscribed.

I don’t know about you, but I like diff -p [1].  Having used it for years, I can read these diffs like a text, while diffs without -p often need to have the original file opened side by side, just to get enough of the context.

Loving diff -p so much, I want to see it everywhere (evil laughter). Alas, in bzr only diff command can easily use -p, just run it as bzr diff --diff-options=-p or store it as an alias in the ~/.bazaar/bazaar.conf.

Actually, for an alias there is a better, although more verbose, alternative:

Unlike simple -p it will not think that a word ending with a semicolon (like a label or, say, public: and private:) is a “C function name”.

But the problem is — only bzr diff can be tuned this way. Bzr email plugin still sends diffs without function names. And bzr gdiff does not show them. And, of course, all other bzr commands — bzr commit, for example, or bzr shelve, bzr unshelve --preview, bzr log --show-diff and others — they are still as unfriendly as before.

I was solving it on a case by case basis — added a post_commit_diffoptions configuration option to the bzr-email plugin, then a command line option to bzr gdiff. But then it occurred to me that I can attack the problem at its core!
Continue reading

Almost a year ago we launched the AskMonty Knowledgebase, a home for information on MariaDB and MySQL. When we launched, only employees had access to write articles, though anyone could ask a question. This was done for technical reasons. The good news is that that has changed, with the latest version we just pushed live, anyone with an account (or an open ID) can create and edit articles.

There is only so much content we can write so we want your contributions, from completely new articles to editing and improving what we already have. If you have questions on how to get started, you can join the Maria Docs group on launchpad and ask on the mailing list. Or you can jump into the #maria channel on Freenode IRC and ask there (ask for dbart or balsdorf).

For those that want to translate articles into other languages (you know who you are) we haven’t forgotten about you. Our next major enhancement to the Knowledgebase is to add full i18n (i.e. internationalization) support. We’re working hard to get something workable up and available to one and all as fast as we can. Stay tuned!