The SkySQL and MariaDB Roadshow Comes to Germany:

Stuttgart 25 January 2013, 9.00-16.00, Sodexo STEP / Engineering Park

Hamburg 1 February 2013, 9.00-16.00, Quality Ambassador Hotel

SkySQL and Monty Program are on the road with our first joint – free – roadshows in Stuttgart and Hamburg, where Monty Widenius will unveil his vision of the future of the MySQL database via MariaDB (the talk will be in English).

In addition, speakers from Codership / Galera expected, as well SkySQL experts and customer speakers.

The latest trends around the MySQL and MariaDB databases will be discussed, in cloud and high availability scenarios.

Finally, the newly released LGPL C & Java connectors for the MySQL database will also be a hot topic.

Registration for Stuttgart

Registration for Hamburg

The event takes place in cooperation with our local partner BOS-it, a competence center for education and training for data center operations.

We only have a limited number of seats available, so please register as soon as possible. Participants are invited to lunch followed by open source networking.

Agenda

Venues
Sodexo STEP
Stuttgarter Engineering Park
Gropiusplatz 2
70563 Stuttgart

Quality Hotel Ambassador Hamburg
Heidenkampsweg 34
20097 Hamburg

We looking forward to seeing you there!

Sign up today: Stuttgart / Hamburg

Connectors now available to the MySQL® community as part of the MariaDB open source project

Helsinki – November 29, 2012 – Monty Program, the home of MariaDB, owned by MySQL®-database-creator Monty Widenius and its employees, and SkySQL, the trusted provider of open source database solutions, today announced the immediate availability of their connectors, ‘MariaDB Client Library for C and MariaDB Client Library for Java Applications’, to the wider MySQL® database community in the permissive LGPL licence.

With this announcement, the connectors become part of the wider MariaDB open source project, to which users will be able to contribute via relevant online resources.

Good news for open source developers

This announcement is relevant for users involved with applications built in C or Java language that also make use of a MariaDB and/or MySQL database, as these require a connector to ensure that the applications & the databases can talk to each other.

News Highlights

As part of their ongoing efforts to contribute innovation and technology to the wider MySQL database and open source user communities, Monty Program & SkySQL  today announced the availability of the MariaDB Client Library for C and MariaDB Client Library for Java Applications.

Up until recently, the two companies had been working on the connectors as a joint internal project used for specific customer requirements and they are now making their connectors generally available to the community as part of the MariaDB open source project.

Connectors enable users to connect from a given application to a database, in this case the MySQL & MariaDB databases. Commercial maintenance & support for the servers and connectors will be available via SkySQL’s Enterprise Data Suite.

Download links & additional resources

Supporting quotes:

“These connectors have been an internal SkySQL/Monty Program project long enough and it was time to make them available to the wider MySQL user community,” said Monty Widenius, CEO of Monty Program. “The connectors will add value to the MariaDB project by making our database technology and the MariaDB project itself easier for everyone to use. If anything, we’re opening the MariaDB project even further to the community and demonstrating that innovation happens with MariaDB.”

 “We’ve been seeing a strong demand for connectors from the MySQL database ecosystem. We are looking for means to ensure that the ecosystem prospers and that both users and developers have a rich set of options. We believe that these connectors will help to stimulate innovation in the ecosystem,” added Patrik Sallner, CEO of SkySQL. “Helping organisations out there adopt the MySQL and MariaDB databases more easily for their software projects also reinforces our position as the one-stop shop for all things to do with the MySQL and MariaDB databases.”

About SkySQL

SkySQL is the trusted provider of open source database solutions for MySQL and MariaDB users – in the enterprise and cloud, providing over 300 enterprise customers including Canal+, ClubMed, Constant Contact, Deutsche Telekom, La Poste, Virgin Mobile, Western Digital and XING with database deployment and management solutions.

With 250+ years of original MySQL experience, SkySQL has the leading MySQL talent pool with sponsorship by the original MySQL and MariaDB creators. It has also developed cloud-based database management solutions that bring ease of use, while providing an effective way to increase database productivity both in the enterprise and the cloud.

For more information, please visit www.skysql.com, and follow the company’s conversations on Twitter and Facebook.

About Monty Program

Monty Program Ab was founded by Michael “Monty” Widenius, the founder and creator of MySQL®. Monty Program is a center of engineering excellence for MariaDB, the Aria storage engine, MySQL®, and other associated technologies.

More than half of our staff are full-time developers, including most of the original MySQL engineers, some new personnel, and Monty. We have a better knowledge of the core MySQL® code than any other company! We are well funded and all of our plans and strategies take a long-term view.

For more information, visit: http://montyprogram.com

 

 

MySQL is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates.

MariaDB is a registered trademark of Monty Program Ab.

SkySQL and the SkySQL logo are trademarks of SkySQL Inc. or SkySQL Ab. Neither SkySQL nor Monty Program is affiliated with MySQL or Oracle. All other company and product names may be trademarks or service marks of their respective owners.

Over the past few days extensive conversations around a new security vulnerability in MariaDB and MySQL have taken place.

It all started as a chain reaction when Monty Program publicly disclosed information about the flaw they had found and about how to make sure your MariaDB and MySQL installations can be fixed. The initial information got assigned the security vulnerabitlity identifier CVE-2012-2122 and the contents can be seen e.g. here http://seclists.org/oss-sec/2012/q2/493.

The bug was found two months ago on April 4th.

Before disclosing the information publicly, given the seriousness of this bug and considering the millions of MySQL and MariaDB installations deployed worldwide, Monty Program informed the biggest distributors of MySQL and MariaDB as a precaution.

On April 6th, Monty Program informed Oracle about it in bug report http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=64884 and provided a suggested fix.

The other big distributors of MySQL and MariaDB are the major Linux distributions that were alerted also in April and provided with a fix for old (unsupported by Oracle) MySQL versions. This gave Oracle and the Linux distributions some lead time to check if their MySQL and/or MariaDB builds were vulnerable and apply the provided fix if needed.

Whether your MySQL or MariaDB installation is vulnerable depends on where and how the binaries you use were built.

Official binaries of MariaDB, provided by Monty Program, MySQL binaries provided by Oracle and – in the case you use Percona’s provided binaries of their server – have all been tested. All these vendors have confirmed that the vulnerability isn’t present in their binaries and that it actually has never been present due to the way that the binaries are built.

All binaries listed on the SkySQL website are either official Oracle or official MariaDB binaries mirrored from dev.mysql.com/downloads and downloads.mariadb.org.

If you built your binaries yourself, you (or your database administrator) can easily test if your installation is vulnerable or not by following the instructions found e.g. here http://ronaldbradford.com/blog/repost-a-tragically-comedic-security-flaw-in-mysql-2012-06-11/.

In the case that you build or have built your own binaries another good piece of information is that the fix (getting rid of the problem independently of how you build) was first released in MariaDB in version 5.5.23 on April 10. Oracle followed by having the fix in MySQL 5.5.24 on May 7.

Most of us, MariaDB and MySQL users, do not have a need to build binaries on our own, i.e. we are on a platform that the official MariaDB and MySQL binaries are provided for and we do not have our own patches that would need to be applied before producing our own binaries.

For most of us it’s therefore recommended to get the binaries from the official channels, such as through the Linux distribution you use via the distribution’s repository or through the official download channel of the database, which in the case of MariaDB is http://downloads.mariadb.org.

Also, if you want to make sure that you’re on the latest version of MariaDB and you’re running on CentOS, Fedora, Debian, Red Hat or Ubuntu you should consider adding MariaDB’s official repository, http://downloads.mariadb.org/mariadb/repositories/.

MariaDB and/or MySQL packagers (such as Linux distributions) should make sure they sign up for the MariaDB mailing list intended for packagers at https://lists.askmonty.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/packagers to receive important notifications including early disclosure of security vulnerabilities, like this one.