About Daniel Bartholomew

Daniel is the MariaDB Release Manager. He is also a Sr. Technical Writer and Systems Administrator for MariaDB Corporation. His books, Getting Started with MariaDB and the MariaDB Cookbook, are available directly from the publisher; or from Amazon, BN, O'Reilly, and other online technical booksellers.

The MariaDB Java Client 1.1.0 has been released. You can download it here.

This version focused on fixing all known database metadata bugs and ConnnectorJ incompatibilities. Specific fixes include:

  • Consistent, compatible with ConnectorJ handling of JDBC catalogs vs schemas vs databases
  • Implementation of several missing methods in DatabaseMetaData
  • Better handling of statement timeouts
  • OSGi-specific entries have been added to MANIFEST.MF so it can be used in OSGi environments
  • Added support for dumpQueriesOnException=true in the JDBC URL
  • Added support for IPv6 addresses in the connector
  • Added SSL support
  • and more…

See the Release Notes and Changelog for more information.

See also the About the MariaDB Java Client page in the AskMonty Knowledgebase.

The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB 10.0.0! This is an alpha release.

MariaDB 10.0 is the current development version of MariaDB. It is built on the MariaDB 5.5 series with backported features from MySQL 5.6 and entirely new features not found anywhere else. See “Explanation on MariaDB 10.0″ and “What comes in between MariaDB now and MySQL 5.6?” for more information on why we’re calling this series “MariaDB 10.0″.

This is the first 10.0-based release, and we are releasing it now to get it into the hands of any who might want to test it. Not all features planned for the MariaDB 10.0 series are included in this release. Additional features will be pushed in future releases.

It should go without saying but: Do not use alpha releases on production systems!

See the Release Notes and Changelog for information on this release in particular and What is MariaDB 10.0? for more information MariaDB 10.0 in general.

Thanks, and enjoy MariaDB!

Like others we were not satisfied with the fix for a bug in MySQL which caused the query cache and partitioning to not work reliably together. The bug, in simple terms, was that if the query cache was enabled and you used partitioned tables and if a partitioned table was using a transactional engine like InnoDB or XtraDB, the query cache could, under certain circumstances, return incorrect results.

Returning incorrect results is a definite, high-priority bug. However, the upstream fix was to disable all caching of queries from partitioned tables. We wanted a better solution because the query cache can be very useful and beneficial for partitioned tables, just like it is useful and beneficial for non-partitioned tables.

The root of the problem was that the query cache did not have any visibility into partitioned tables. In particular it didn’t know anything about a given table’s storage engine, including if the table was transactional or not. This lack of information prevented the query cache from intelligently caching and returning the cached results of queries.

We solved this by creating a way for the query cache to talk to the underlying storage engine of a partitioned table to see if it is:

  1. OK to cache the result of a query
  2. OK to return a cached result

With that information in hand the query cache can now properly cache new queries and provide correct cached results for duplicate queries every time, no matter if the table is partitioned (or not), or transactional (or not).

The patch is already in the MariaDB 5.5 source on Launchpad and will be in our next release of MariaDB 5.5.

Update: Monty has also written about this on his blog.